VBA RoundUp

What is VBA RoundUp Function?

The VBA RoundUp function is used to round a number up to a specified number of decimal places. This function is beneficial when you need to ensure that a number is rounded up, regardless of the fractional part. Unlike the standard “Round” function, which rounds to the nearest integer, RoundUp always rounds up.

Let us look at an example where we have the number 9.25. When you execute this code, it initializes two variables, “originalNumber” and “roundedNumber,” where “originalNumber” is set to the value 9.25, representing the number we want to round up. The VBA RoundUp function is then applied with a second argument of 1, indicating that we want to round up to one decimal place.

VBA RoundUp Function Example 1

As a result, the original number 9.25 is rounded up to 9.3. A message box is displayed, presenting the original number and the rounded number in the following format: “Original Number: 9.25” and “Rounded Number: 9.3.”

VBA RoundUp Function Example 1-1

Note: The error message “VBA RoundUp function not defined” typically occurs when you attempt to use a function that VBA does not recognize.

In VBA, there is no built-in VBA RoundUp function, and you should use “Application.WorksheetFunction.RoundUp” to perform rounding up.

Key Takeaways
  1. VBA RoundUp function rounds a number up to a specified number of decimal places.
  2. VBA RoundUp is useful when you need to ensure that a number is rounded up, regardless of the fractional part.
  3. When a negative value is used as the second argument, the RoundUp function rounds to the closest multiple of 10, raised to the power specified.
  4. When you’re working with very big or very tiny numbers, be careful because rounding might be less exact in those situations.

How To Use VBA RoundUp Function?

Step 1: In the Excel workbook, press ALT + F11 to open the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) editor.

How To Use VBA RoundUp - Step 1

Step 2: Inside the VBA editor, go to Insert > Module to insert a new module where you can write your VBA code.

How To Use VBA RoundUp - Step 1-1

Step 3: In the newly created module, you can start writing your VBA code, including RoundUp. The basic syntax of the VBA RoundUp function is as follows:

RoundUp(number, decimal_places)

  • number: The number you want to round up.
  • decimal_places: The number of decimal places to which you want to round up.

Step 4: Save the module, exit the VBA editor, and return to your Excel workbook or the VBA-enabled application where you want to use this code.

Step 5: To run your code: Press ALT + F8 to open the “Macro” dialog. Select the macro you want to run and click “Run.”


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Examples

Example #1 – When the Second Argument is Zero

In this example, the VBA RoundUp function rounds the number 12.345 up to the nearest integer, resulting in 13.0.

Step 1: In the new module, we begin by declaring two variables, originalNumber and roundedNumber of the Double VBA data type.

These variables will store the original number and the result of the rounding, respectively.

VBA RoundUp Example1- Step 1

Step 2: We assign the value 12.345 to the originalNumber variable.

VBA RoundUp Example1- Step 1-1

Step 3: Here, we use the RoundUp function with the arguments originalNumber and 0 as the number of decimal places to round to. The result is stored in the roundedNumber variable.

VBA RoundUp Example1- Step 1-2

Step 4: Finally, we use a MsgBox VBA function to display the original number and the rounded number.

VBA RoundUp Example1- Step 1-3

Step 5: Now save the macro. Upon executing the code, it rounds the original number 12.345 up to the nearest whole number and presents the result as “Original Number: 12.345” and “Rounded Number: 13” in a message box.

VBA RoundUp Example1- Step 1-4

Here is the full code:

Sub RoundUpExample1()

    Dim originalNumber As Double

    Dim roundedNumber As Double

      originalNumber = 12.345

    roundedNumber = Application.WorksheetFunction.RoundUp(originalNumber, 0)

      MsgBox “Original Number: ” & originalNumber & vbCrLf & “Rounded Number: ” & roundedNumber

End Sub

Example #2 – When the Second Argument is 1

With a second argument of 1, the VBA RoundUp function rounds the number 12.345 up to one decimal place, yielding 12.4.

Step 1: Like the first example, in each of the following examples, we start by declaring two variables, originalNumber and roundedNumber, both of which are of the Double data type.

These variables serve to store the original number that requires rounding and the result of the rounding operation.

VBA RoundUp Example2- Step 1

Step 2: This time, we use RoundUp with one as the number of decimal places to round to.

VBA RoundUp Example2- Step 1-1

Step 3: Now save the macro. When you run the code, it rounds the original number 12.345 up to one decimal place and displays the result as “Original Number: 12.345” and “Rounded Number: 12.4” in a message box.

VBA RoundUp Example2- Step 1-2

Here is the full code:

Sub RoundUpExample2()

    Dim originalNumber As Double

    Dim roundedNumber As Double

        originalNumber = 12.345

    roundedNumber = RoundUp(originalNumber, 1)

        MsgBox “Original Number: ” & originalNumber & vbCrLf & “Rounded Number: ” & roundedNumber

End Sub

Example #3 – When the Second Argument is 2

When 2 is specified as the second argument, the VBA RoundUp function rounds 12.345 up to two decimal places, resulting in 12.35.

Step 1: In this instance, we employ the VBA RoundUp function, specifying a rounding precision of 2 decimal places.

VBA RoundUp Example3- Step 1

Step 2: Upon executing the code, it performs rounding on the initial number, 12.345, upward to two decimal place and presents the outcome in a message box as “Original Number: 12.345” and “Rounded Number: 12.35.”

VBA RoundUp Example3- Step 1-1

Here is the full code:

Sub RoundUpExample3()

    Dim originalNumber As Double

    Dim roundedNumber As Double

        originalNumber = 12.345

    roundedNumber = RoundUp(originalNumber, 2)

       MsgBox “Original Number: ” & originalNumber & vbCrLf & “Rounded Number: ” & roundedNumber

End Sub

Example #4 – When the Second Argument is 3

With a second argument of 3, the VBA RoundUp function rounds 12.345 up to three decimal places, giving 12.345.

Step 1: In this case, we employ the VBA RoundUp function with a precision of 3 decimal places for rounding.

VBA RoundUp Example4- Step 1

Step 2: When the code is executed, it conducts rounding on the starting value, 12.345, in an upward direction, and the result is displayed within a message box, showing “Original Number: 12.345” and “Rounded Number: 12.345,” rounded to three decimal places.

VBA RoundUp Example4- Step 1-1

Here is the full code:

Sub RoundUpExample4()

    Dim originalNumber As Double

    Dim roundedNumber As Double

       originalNumber = 12.345

    roundedNumber = RoundUp(originalNumber, 3)

        MsgBox “Original Number: ” & originalNumber & vbCrLf & “Rounded Number: ” & roundedNumber

End Sub

Example #5 – When the Second Argument is -1

When -1 is specified as the second argument, the VBA RoundUp function rounds 12.345 up to the nearest ten, resulting in 20.0.

Step 1: In this scenario, we utilize the VBA RoundUp function while setting the number of decimal places for rounding to -1.

When the second argument in the VBA RoundUp function is set to a negative value, such as -1, it rounds the number up to the nearest multiple of 10 raised to the absolute value of that argument.

In this case, with -1 as the argument, it rounds to the nearest multiple of 10^1, which is 10. So, any number less than 10 would round up to 10.

VBA RoundUp Example5- Step 1

Step 2: When you execute this code, it rounds the original number 12.345 to the nearest multiple of 10 (in this case, 10) and displays the result as “Original Number: 12.345” and “Rounded Number: 10” in a message box.

VBA RoundUp Example5- Step 1-1

Here is the full code:

Sub RoundUpExample5()

    Dim originalNumber As Double

    Dim roundedNumber As Double

       originalNumber = 12.345

    roundedNumber = RoundUp(originalNumber, -1)

       MsgBox “Original Number: ” & originalNumber & vbCrLf & “Rounded Number: ” & roundedNumber

End Sub

Example #6 – When the Second Argument is -2

With a second argument of -2, the VBA RoundUp function rounds 12.345 up to the nearest hundred, yielding 100.0.

Step 1: In this instance, we apply the VBA RoundUp function with -2 specified as the precision for rounding.

When -2 is used as the second argument in the VBA RoundUp function, it rounds the number up to the nearest multiple of 100, as 10 is raised to the absolute value of -2 is 100.

VBA RoundUp Example6- Step 1

Step 2: When you execute this code, it rounds the original number 12.345 up to the nearest multiple of 100, resulting in “Original Number: 12.345” and “Rounded Number: 100” displayed in a message box.

VBA RoundUp Example6- Step 1-1

Here is the full code:

Sub RoundUpExample6()

    Dim originalNumber As Double

    Dim roundedNumber As Double

       originalNumber = 12.345

    roundedNumber = RoundUp(originalNumber, -2)

        MsgBox “Original Number: ” & originalNumber & vbCrLf & “Rounded Number: ” & roundedNumber

End Sub

Example #7 – When the Second Argument is -3:

In this case, the VBA RoundUp function rounds 12.345 up to the nearest thousand, resulting in 1000.0.

Step 1: In this context, we use -3 as the second argument in the VBA RoundUp function, it rounds the number up to the nearest multiple of 1,000, as 10 raised to the absolute value of -3 is 1,000.

VBA RoundUp Example7 - Step 1

Step 2: When you execute this code, it rounds the original number 12.345 up to the nearest multiple of 1,000, resulting in “Original Number: 12.345” and “Rounded Number: 2,000” displayed in a message box.

VBA RoundUp Example7 - Step 1-1

Here is the full code:

Sub RoundUpExample7()

    Dim originalNumber As Double

    Dim roundedNumber As Double

       originalNumber = 12.345

    roundedNumber = RoundUp(originalNumber, -3)

       MsgBox “Original Number: ” & originalNumber & vbCrLf & “Rounded Number: ” & roundedNumber

End Sub

Important Things To Note

  1. The VBA RoundUp function expects a numeric expression as its first argument. Ensure that the variable or value you provide is of a numeric data type (e.g., Double, Integer).
  2. When a negative number is the second argument, the RoundUp function rounds it up to the nearest power of 10 corresponding to the absolute value of the second argument.
  3. Be aware that the VBA RoundUp function does not provide precise control over rounding. It rounds to the specified number of decimal places but does not guarantee a specific number of decimal places in the result.
  4. Consider how the VBA RoundUp function behaves with very large or very small numbers. Rounding can have unexpected results when dealing with extreme values.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. Why is VBA RoundUp Function Not Working?

If the VBA RoundUp function is not working as expected, check the following:

• Ensure that you are using the correct function name (RoundUp) and syntax.
• Verify that your code is running in a VBA-enabled environment (e.g., Excel, Access).
• Check if there are any errors in your code or incorrect data types.

2. What is the Difference Between VBA RoundUp Function and VBA RoundDown Function?

The main difference is in their behavior:

• RoundUp always rounds a number up to the specified decimal places, ensuring it is equal to or greater than the original number.
• RoundDown rounds a number down to the specified decimal places, ensuring it is equal to or less than the original number.

3. What Happens if I Provide a Negative Number of Decimal Places to the RoundUp Function?

When you provide a negative number as the second argument to the VBA RoundUp function, it rounds the number up to the nearest power of 10, corresponding to the absolute value of the second argument. For example, with -2 as the second argument, it rounds to the nearest hundred.

4. Are There Any Limitations to the Precision of the RoundUp Function?

Yes, there are limitations to precision when using the VBA RoundUp function. It rounds to the specified number of decimal places but may not provide precise control over the number of decimal places in the result. Additionally, extreme values (very large or very small numbers) may lead to unexpected results due to floating-point representation limitations.

This has been a guide to VBA RoundUp. Here we explain the How To Use VBA RoundUp Function along with examples & downloadable excel template. You can learn more from the following articles –

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